cosmos flower

Herland: Feminist Utopias, Women-Only Spaces, and the Men Who Want to Conquer Them, Part 2

In my post from July, I discussed the three archetypes that the three men who entered Herland exemplified: the philanderer, the woman-worshiper, and the observer. In this post, I’ll draw parallels between those three types and the reasons men often give for wanting to enter women-only spaces.  Continue reading at Luna Station Quarterly….

cosmos flower

Dr. Sabrina Starnaman Q&A: Creating and Teaching SF as Literature Classes, Part 2

Recently, I interviewed Dr. Sabrina Starnaman, Clinical Assistant Professor of Literary Studies at The University of Texas at Dallas, who teaches science fiction and fantasy as literature courses.  Some of the classes she has taught include “The Hero’s Journey,” “LeGuin and Butler,” and “Cyborgs and Robots.”  Her research foci include American literature written by and about… Read more »

cosmos flower

Herland: Feminist Utopias, Women-Only Spaces, and the Men Who Want to Conquer Them, Part 1

Among the problems of aging utopian novels is the fact that many of the ideas these perfect societies are founded upon become outdated and, sadly, obscure the lessons present-day readers can take from them. Such is the case with Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s 1915 novel Herland, in which three male explorers from the US attempt to… Read more »

cosmos flower

Princes, Princesses, and Parenting

While reading Sheila Finch’s Myths, Metaphors, and Science Fiction, I ran across a passage that gave me, as a parent, pause: “In later centuries, we seem to have watered down the messages [of fairy tales], especially in the post-Disney world, but the continuing popularity, even into our scientific age, of what might otherwise be considered… Read more »

cosmos flower

Mosquitoes, Science, and Science Fiction: Who’s Going to Save Us From What Comes Next?

Late spring in North Texas brings with it warmer nights, more thunderstorms, and, alas, mosquitoes. Many, many mosquitoes. Some bite during the day, others bite at dawn and dusk. We all cover up in long sleeves and douse ourselves in whatever promises to keep the critters from feasting on us, but the welts show up… Read more »

cosmos flower

Dr. Sabrina Starnaman Q&A: Creating and Teaching SF as Literature Classes, Part 1

Recently, I interviewed Dr. Sabrina Starnaman, Clinical Assistant Professor of Literary Studies at The University of Texas at Dallas, who teaches science fiction and fantasy as literature courses.  Some of the classes she has taught include “The Hero’s Journey,” “LeGuin and Butler,” and “Cyborgs and Robots.”  Her research focuses include American literature written by and about… Read more »

cosmos flower

National Poetry Month: One More Way to Celebrate

Here in the US, the Academy of American Poets recognizes April as National Poetry Month, a time to highlight the importance of poetry in the public sphere and to support the writing, reading, and teaching of poetry. The AAP suggests thirty ways to celebrate National Poetry Month, which includes reading poems and reading about poetry… Read more »

cosmos flower

Gender, Names, and Publishing Under Initials

In a recent post on her website, Mary Robinette Kowal noted that the percentage of SFF books available for purchase at airport bookstores that were written by women and non-binary authors was alarmingly small in comparison to those written by men. Her explanation of her methodology struck me: “If I couldn’t tell and/or didn’t know,… Read more »

cosmos flower

Writer Bribes: If You Just Finish Revising This Section, You Can Have That Latte

Greetings from behind a cup of coffee. Not just any coffee. Coconut vanilla flavored coffee with a splash of milk and a bit of foam on top. Indulgent, a bit sweet, and rather pretty in the clear glass cafe mug. It’s sitting on the slate coaster between my monitor and me as I write this…. Read more »

Mercury Messenger stamps, still unopened....

Space, Science, Stamps, and Storytelling

Admission: I buy far more postage stamps than I’ll ever need for the cards and letters I mail. Something about the imagery—these neat presentations of nature and history and culture—combined with the utility of stamps makes them irresistible. To me, anyway. So, of course, I was excited to see the preview of the USPS’s 2016… Read more »

Latest
  • cosmos flower

    Herland: Feminist Utopias, Women-Only Spaces, and the Men Who Want to Conquer Them, Part 2

    In my post from July, I discussed the three archetypes that the three men who entered Herland exemplified: the philanderer, the woman-worshiper, and the observer. In this post, I’ll draw parallels between those three types and the reasons men often give for wanting to enter women-only spaces.  Continue reading at Luna Station Quarterly….

  • cosmos flower

    Dr. Sabrina Starnaman Q&A: Creating and Teaching SF as Literature Classes, Part 2

    Recently, I interviewed Dr. Sabrina Starnaman, Clinical Assistant Professor of Literary Studies at The University of Texas at Dallas, who teaches science fiction and fantasy as literature courses.  Some of the classes she has taught include “The Hero’s Journey,” “LeGuin and Butler,” and “Cyborgs and Robots.”  Her research foci include American literature written by and about… Read more »

  • cosmos flower

    Herland: Feminist Utopias, Women-Only Spaces, and the Men Who Want to Conquer Them, Part 1

    Among the problems of aging utopian novels is the fact that many of the ideas these perfect societies are founded upon become outdated and, sadly, obscure the lessons present-day readers can take from them. Such is the case with Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s 1915 novel Herland, in which three male explorers from the US attempt to… Read more »

  • cosmos flower

    Princes, Princesses, and Parenting

    While reading Sheila Finch’s Myths, Metaphors, and Science Fiction, I ran across a passage that gave me, as a parent, pause: “In later centuries, we seem to have watered down the messages [of fairy tales], especially in the post-Disney world, but the continuing popularity, even into our scientific age, of what might otherwise be considered… Read more »

  • cosmos flower

    Mosquitoes, Science, and Science Fiction: Who’s Going to Save Us From What Comes Next?

    Late spring in North Texas brings with it warmer nights, more thunderstorms, and, alas, mosquitoes. Many, many mosquitoes. Some bite during the day, others bite at dawn and dusk. We all cover up in long sleeves and douse ourselves in whatever promises to keep the critters from feasting on us, but the welts show up… Read more »

  • cosmos flower

    Dr. Sabrina Starnaman Q&A: Creating and Teaching SF as Literature Classes, Part 1

    Recently, I interviewed Dr. Sabrina Starnaman, Clinical Assistant Professor of Literary Studies at The University of Texas at Dallas, who teaches science fiction and fantasy as literature courses.  Some of the classes she has taught include “The Hero’s Journey,” “LeGuin and Butler,” and “Cyborgs and Robots.”  Her research focuses include American literature written by and about… Read more »

  • cosmos flower

    National Poetry Month: One More Way to Celebrate

    Here in the US, the Academy of American Poets recognizes April as National Poetry Month, a time to highlight the importance of poetry in the public sphere and to support the writing, reading, and teaching of poetry. The AAP suggests thirty ways to celebrate National Poetry Month, which includes reading poems and reading about poetry… Read more »

  • cosmos flower

    Gender, Names, and Publishing Under Initials

    In a recent post on her website, Mary Robinette Kowal noted that the percentage of SFF books available for purchase at airport bookstores that were written by women and non-binary authors was alarmingly small in comparison to those written by men. Her explanation of her methodology struck me: “If I couldn’t tell and/or didn’t know,… Read more »

  • cosmos flower

    Writer Bribes: If You Just Finish Revising This Section, You Can Have That Latte

    Greetings from behind a cup of coffee. Not just any coffee. Coconut vanilla flavored coffee with a splash of milk and a bit of foam on top. Indulgent, a bit sweet, and rather pretty in the clear glass cafe mug. It’s sitting on the slate coaster between my monitor and me as I write this…. Read more »

  • Mercury Messenger stamps, still unopened....

    Space, Science, Stamps, and Storytelling

    Admission: I buy far more postage stamps than I’ll ever need for the cards and letters I mail. Something about the imagery—these neat presentations of nature and history and culture—combined with the utility of stamps makes them irresistible. To me, anyway. So, of course, I was excited to see the preview of the USPS’s 2016… Read more »